Is Israel on the verge of assassinating Iran’s nuclear scientists? Where is the peace?


Statements made by Israeli defence Minister, Moshe Ya’alon have triggered “assumptions” that Israel is on the verge of assassinating Iran’s nuclear scientists. This move comes in the wake of a historic peace deal that will oversee relinquishing production of nuclear weapons and the relief of sanctions against Iran.

Netanyahu’s administration has recently launched attacks against the deal that has been described by nuclear experts in the United States (US), as “innovative and stringent”. In a letter to US president Barrack Obama, twenty-nine of the nation’s top scientists that includes Nobel laureates and veteran nuclear experts hailed the Iran deal. The letter comes as both Iran and US seek the approval from their law-making bodies to assent the deal.

In a recent interview with a German Newspaper, Moshe Ya’alon is quoted vehemently calling for the ultimate end of the Iranian nuclear programme. He said, “…one way or another the Iranian nuclear programme must be stopped”. This has only shown the deteriorating relations between Israel and US, especially under the Obama administration. When questioned whether Iran would see further the deaths of its nuclear scientists, Ya’alon allegedly told the newspaper, “We should be ready to defend ourselves. I’m not responsible for the lives of the Iranian Scientists”.

The question that still lingers is -will the Iranian Peace deal finally ensure long lasting peace within all parties involved or will it further derail attaining peace in the fragile Middle East? President Obama asserted, in an interview by CNN, that the only other option to the peace deal would be war, an approach highly favoured by the Israeli government. Over the last few years, there have been a notable number of deaths of Iranian nuclear scientists in arguably unclear circumstances. Even though Israel has denied accusations of responsibility for such attacks, statements by Iranian Defence Minister point towards involvement.

Israel is keen to protect itself against Iran, which it sees as a threat to its existence. Netanyahu’s government is critical that uplifting sanctions against Iran would create a sense of liberalist movement. There seems to be no ultimate culmination of Iran’s peace deal, an accord that many analysts have pointed to as being arguably superlative in the prevailing conditions. Further assassinations of Iranian nuclear scientists does not only escalate the impetus but also serves to dampen historical US-Israeli relations. There is a need for negotiations and talks between involved parties towards creating peace and stability for all parties involved.