Timothy Law


Back In The Blue Helmet: Canada’s New Commitment To UN Peacekeeping

In August, the Canadian Government, headed by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, announced their new commitment toward UN Peacekeeping Missions. Committing $450 million, and up to 600 troops to take part in peacekeeping missions around the world, it marks an emerging Canadian re-interest into peacekeeping and its role in such missions. […]


Eyes On Central Asia: The Death Of Islam Karimov And Its Implications

On September 2nd, the leader of Uzbekistan, Islam Karimov, died after suffering a stroke. Although being the leader of a small post-Soviet republic in Central Asia, his passing, along with the release of the nation from his iron grip, marks a potentially large change affecting the geopolitics in the region. […]


The “Globalized” Reach Of Terrorism: The New Trend Of ISIS’s Global Reach

Globalism has long been the defining feature of the modern 21st Century, with the rise of transnational companies and the interconnection of national economies bringing new found wealth to many areas of the globe. However, with such connection and possibilities also comes the opportunities for increased criminality to proliferate. Although […]


Making American (Foreign Policy) Great Again?: Brief Commentary of Trump’s Foreign Policy

  On Wednesday April 27th, Donald Trump, as part of his election campaign, announced his vision for American foreign policy and detailed the “America First” foreign plan. Trump’s speech highlighted his view of foreign policy as formed on a basis in confrontation and strengthening America’s working relations with other major powers, […]


“N” Is For North Korea And Not Nuclear Weapons: North Korea’s Recent Hydrogen Bomb Test And Its Continuation Of North Korea’s “Nuclear Diplomacy”

On January 6th 2010, at 10:00:01, North Korea conducted an underground nuclear test at its Punggye-ri Nuclear Test Site. It was announced over the North Korean news network, and confirmed by seismological reports by both the United States Geological Service and the China Earthquake Networks Center, with both groups releasing reports of a seismic event resulting […]


A Step In The Right Direction: The Japan-South Korea “Comfort Women” Statement

On December 28th 2015, a historical agreement on the issue of Comfort Women between South Korea and Japan was reached. In the official announcement from the two nations’ Foreign Ministers, a statement entitled the “Japan-South Korea Statement on Comfort Women” was issued. Within the statement, the two governments described their […]


Playing Telephone Between Beijing And Taipei: The New Era Of Relations Between Taiwan And Mainland China

On November 3rd, the office in charge of Taiwan relations in Beijing announced that the leaders of China and Taiwan will meet in Singapore on November 7th. Unlike other head of state meetings, this meeting is the the first time the leaders of the People’s Republic of China and Taiwan […]


End of the One Child Policy: China’s need for Long-Term Sustainability

On October 29th after 37 years, China abolished its major “One Child policy” which dictated by law that Chinese families could only have one child. Although this policy was officially abolished as part of the solution towards the increasing age of China’s population and discrepancies in the sex ratio of […]


From A Beach In Turkey: Canada’s Need To Adequately Respond To The Syrian Refugee Crisis

Earlier this month, on September 2nd, a picture of a young Syrian refugee being lifted by a Turkish Police Officer hit headlines across the world. Although numerous pictures of the plight of Syrian and other migrants had been displayed across numerous new sources, this picture in particular connected deeply with […]


Going on 70 Years: The Need for Youth to Lead the Movement in understanding World War Two in East Asia

In August, during the 70th anniversary of the end of the Second World War, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe issued a speech, eluding to the historic anniversary. Although many nations, especially that of East Asian nations, which were directly occupied and acted upon by the Japanese during the conflict had […]


The Voice of the Boat People and its Lesson for the Syrian Refugee Crisis

Recently, a Vietnamese immigrant, Tat Wa Lay, who immigrated to England in 1984 as part of the Vietnamese Boat People, posted a Facebook post that was widely shared: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10153591600018545&set=a.10150177977848545.310648.500628544&type=1 At the end of his post, Lay asks for people to “take a moment to think about all the Syrian refugees […]


Across The DMZ: The Need To Reconnect And Talk More With The Hermit Kingdom On A Regional Scale

On August 14th, three South Korean soldiers were injured by a landmine blast while patrolling outside their post in the South Korean side of the Demilitarized Zone, separating North and South Korea. The South Korean Military blamed the North Korea Military, stating that it was a “clear provocation by the North […]


Across the DMZ: The Need to Reconnect and Talk More with the Hermit Kingdom on a Regional Scale

On August 14th, three South Korean soldiers were injured by a landmine blast while patrolling outside their post in the South Korean side of the Demilitarized Zone, separating North and South Korea. The South Korean Military blamed the North Korea Military, stating that it was a “clear provocation by the North […]


Caught in the Middle: Cultural Preservation with ISIS and its Opposition

Amidst the recent ongoing conflict in Syria, parts of the famous Palmyra archaeological complex has been damaged by terrorist organization, ISIS. Deemed by ISIS as “pagan and idolatrous”, prominent historical landmarks namely the Temple of Baal Shamin, a temple dedicated towards a Phoenician god, were obliterated with the use of explosives. In […]