Day: July 15, 2020

Lessons About Climate Change From The COVID-19 Pandemic

The global COVID-19 pandemic is, without a doubt, the defining event of 2020. Every country in the world has experienced dramatic changes in everyday life and faced one of the worst economic crises in their history. A few months ago, most people considered the idea of lockdown, with its tremendous

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Trudeau Won’t Attend Washington Summit, Mexican President Says

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau did not attend talks in Washington, D.C. the week of July 6th, to inaugurate the start of the new North American trade deal, and the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA). While Mexico’s President Andrés Manuel López Obrador committed to meeting the U.S. President in-person, Trudeau abstained

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Soldiers Implicated in Gang Rape of Indigenous Colombian Girl

On June 23, Colombian Attorney General Francisco Barbosa announced charges against seven soldiers for the gang rape of a 13-year-old indigenous girl. According to Lejandrina Pastor, an advisor to the Organización Nacional Indígena de Colombia (ONIC), the girl is a member of the Emberá people, an indigenous group highlighted by

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Political Unrest In Mali Spills Over Into Violence

A protest organised by what is becoming known as the “June 5th movement” in the Malian capital of Bamako has seen at least four people killed and twenty others wounded. In response to the protest, Malian President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita has now dissolved the country’s constitutional court. The movement, with

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Why Donating Goods As Disaster Relief May Be Negative

As a country, New Zealand is always willing and wanting to help its neighbours during a crisis. It is what we do, and always have. However, our actions have a possibility of causing long-term damage and we must be more aware that our actions do not actually have a negative

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Political Unrest In Mali Spills Over Into Violence

A protest organized by what is becoming known as the “June 5th movement” in the Malian capital of Bamako has seen at least four people killed and twenty others wounded. And, in response to this instability and protest, Mali’s President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita has now dissolved the country’s constitutional court.

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“On The Far Side Of The Trail Of Tears Was A promise”: Supreme Court Upholds 1866 Muscogee Nation Boundaries

On June 9, in a 5-4 ruling on McGirt v. Oklahoma, the U.S. Supreme Court found that the 1866 treaty delineating Muscogee Nation’s reservation remains legally binding. Further, the case establishes that the reservation boundaries demarcate criminal jurisdiction over tribal citizens. In 1997, Jimcy McGirt was convicted by an Oklahoma

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The Organization for World Peace