Turkey And Russia To Build Hospital For Syrians Fleeing Eastern Ghouta


Turkey and Russia announced the construction of a medical facility in Tel Abyad in hopes of tending to those trying to evade the unrest in Eastern Ghouta this past Wednesday. The development is said to be located around 300 miles away from the capital city of Damascus. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan announced that the aiding countries would come together to build the hospital, encouraging a “lasting ceasefire,” Al Jazeera reports. Along with leaders from Russia and Iran, the conference communicated Erdogan’s plans to make peace among the adverse parties. Their efforts begin with helping those that are seeking shelter and medical retribution.

One reporter from Al Jazeera remarked that the countries harped on the necessity of peace in the ongoing Syrian crisis but also mentioned that, “… ironically, the Syrian government or opposition was not present in this meeting where Syria’s fate was decided on.” The seven-year long civil war sparked out of a conflict between the Syrian government under President Bashar al-Assad, and forces opposing the government’s actions. With support from his allies, reportedly the Syrian government and al-Assad are closing in on the capital of Damascus, where opposing forces hold strength.

Turkey, leaning relatively moderate in the war, attended a number of peace talks in Vienna to work through the continuing controversy. Though other aiding countries of Russia and Iran both attended these talks as well, they strongly support the Syrian government’s efforts to take back the country from the opposition.

Earlier last month, the Syrian government made gains on Eastern Ghouta, splitting the opposition’s command into three parts. Seizing the war-torn suburb gave the government a larger threshold in the civil war. Around 8,000 opposition fighters and civilians entered evacuation procedures after the siege by the government. With Russia’s aid and involvement, the evacuation of these citizens was a part of their brokered agreement with the Syrian government.

Among other negotiations, Russia enacted a five hour long “humanitarian corridor,” where opposition forces and civilians could flee the suburb of Damascus in late February. The country believed the militants located in the suburb blocked aid deliveries and evacuation routes put in place by their military.

The new hospital, leaders hope, will exemplify a final stretch of solidarity in the gruesome civil war while returning power to the government in place. The construction date was not released in the press conference, but with consistent effort to stifle opposing forces, the hospital is said to be established in the near future.

Kendall Rotar

Kendall is a Junior at Florida State University studying Sociology and English. She is currently the Editor in chief of a start up magazine evolve.
Kendall Rotar

About Kendall Rotar

Kendall is a Junior at Florida State University studying Sociology and English. She is currently the Editor in chief of a start up magazine evolve.