Narcotic Combat in Mexico


Much withheld from the headlines of media is the Drug war that is currently taking place in Mexico. The country of Mexico shares the second longest border in the world with the United States and only second to the border shared with the United States and Canada. Mexico is home to 122.2 million people, most of whom derive from the heritages of Latin America. Situated just adjacent to the waters of the Pacific Ocean, Mexico finds pride in building and improving the societal and economical foundations that it’s democratic state is set on. Although Mexico is home to many of these beautiful and intriguing things, it is also the host of an ongoing drug war that has been prolonged for the betterment of a decades time.

Despite the fact the War on Drugs dates back almost 10 years ago , the origins of the conflict are much deeper. Due to it’s geographical region, Mexico has been a long standing means to allocate narcotics and contraband resources within the west, specifically the United States prohibited drug market. This line of operation dates back to the 1920’s with the American Alcohol Prohibition, during which time, the illicit Mexican barters were responsible for supplying the outlawed beverages to United States gangsters who would then dispute it amongst the people who were still open to purchase.

The Drug Market really started to situate with the establishment of Felix Gallardo and the embellishment of the Guadalajara Cartel. Through the duration of the 1980’s Gallardo and his Cartel controlled and monopolized all illegal drugs that existed within the country. Initially, the drug trade begun with the exchange of marijuana and opium that extended pass the borders of the United States. It then continued it’s process of expansion with the cooperative relation between Mexico and Colombia, chiefly through one, Pablo Escobar. With this new found friendship, Mexico now had access to new South American and Caribbean drugs markets, which now made them international drug manufacturers.

The war on drugs also had adverse effects on the average Mexican citizen as well. As a means to take down drug cartels the government allocated the responsibility of the countries policing into the possession of the Mexican Military. With this new found authority, they were not only responsible for public security but also had the power to implement new laws. Throughout the duration of the altercation, there have been many occasions reported, on both the Mexican police and military, where they have been scrutinized for using illicit practice while on carrying out job related duties. One instance of this is found when the United States Department of State declared, ” the military in Mexico were accused of committing serious human rights violations as they carried out government efforts to combat drug cartels.” Some of these human rights violations included; illegal arrests, secret and prolonged detention, torture, rape, extrajudicial execution, and fabrication of evidence.

Since the origination of the Mexican Drug Market, drug traffickers have been known to pawn policemen and slaughter their rivals as a means to achieving organizational power. But more recently Mexico Cartels have been targeting politicians and local leaders in attempts to destabilize the countries political structure. They aim to displace the national government so they can communize the state in their favor. This communization, would also evoke governmental corruption, legislative representation and access to the nations financial economy. Not to mention, the nations public security. Here it is clearly illustrated of how the existence of the Mexican Drug Market can be seen as hazardous one to the well-being of the Mexican society.

The United States Justice Department considers Mexico to be the greatest threat of organized crime toward that country. This statement is equally applicable to countries like Canada where the Mexican drug cartels attempts to maneuver cocaine inside the nation, which briefly prompted an upsurge in gang violence in Vancouver. This is heavily due to the fact that cocaine prices have increased in recent years as a result of a prolonged coke shortage. The Mexican Drug Market is also making its presence felt in Europe where it is known to be the biggest import of cocaine to Europe across the Atlantic Ocean and imported though Southern Europe.

On March 25, 2009, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton stated that “America’s insatiable demand for illegal drugs fuels the Mexican drug trade” as well as, “the United States bears shared responsibility for the drug-fueled violence sweeping Mexico.” In seeking partnership from the United States, Mexican officials point out that the illicit drug trade is a shared problem in need of a shared solution. They also state that most of the financing for the Mexican drug operations come from American drug consumers. As a result, the U.S. Congress passed a legislation to provide Mexico and Central American countries with $1.6 billion USD for the Mérida Initiative, a three-year international assistance plan. The Mérida Initiative provides Mexico and Central American countries with law enforcement training, equipment, as well as structural advice to strengthen the national justice systems. It can also be highlighted that the Mérida Initiative does not include cash nor weapons. This instance illustrates a scene where the global community recognizes the detriment that arises from the Mexican Drug Market and makes an adamant attempt to prevent it.

Despite the hardships that arise from the Mexican Drug War, the efforts of the governmental forces have not gone in vein. Most recently, the Mexican Operatives have captured drug lord Servando “La Tuta” Gomez, leader of the Templar Knights crime family of Western Mexico. Following his time being a school teacher, Mr. Gomez and his comrades were allegedly responsible for the abduction and apparent murder of 43 public servant educators, an act that was carried out by police accused of being corrupt and connected with the criminal gang. Amongst many on other treacherous and peril transgressions. Mr. Gomez and the Knights Templar also monopolized a very lucrative part of the methamphetamine trade that transpired in western Mexico, specifically, the Michoacán region. Although the detainee was known for his violent wrath and drug trafficking, he was also known for indulging in the business and political realm of the region and at one point took effective control over the state’s international port, Lazaro Cardenas, making millions from illegal mining of iron ore trading.

Much withheld from the headlines of media is the Drug war that is currently taking place in Mexico. The country of Mexico shares the second longest border in the world with the United States, only second to the border shared between the United States and Canada. Mexico is home to 122.2 million people, most of whom are of Latin America nationality. Situated just adjacent to the waters of the Pacific Ocean, Mexico finds pride in building and improving the societal and economical foundations that its democratic state is set on. Although Mexico is home to many of these beautiful and intriguing things, it is also the host of an ongoing drug war that has been prolonged for the better part of a decade’s time.

Despite the fact that the War on Drugs dates back to almost 10 years ago, the origins of the conflict are much deeper. Due to its geographical region, Mexico has been a long standing port for the distribution of narcotics and contraband to the west, specifically the United States prohibited drug market. This line of operation dates back to the 1920’s with the American Alcohol Prohibition, during which time, the illicit Mexican barters were responsible for supplying the outlawed beverages to United States gangsters who would then dispute it amongst the people who were still open to purchase.

The Drug Market really started to situate with the establishment of Felix Gallardo and the embellishment of the Guadalajara Cartel. Through the duration of the 1980’s Gallardo and his Cartel controlled and monopolized all illegal drugs that existed within the country. Initially, the drug trade began with the exchange of marijuana and opium that extended pass the borders of the United States. It then continued its process of expansion with the cooperative relation between Mexico and Colombia, chiefly through one, Pablo Escobar. With this new found friendship, Mexico now had access to new South American and Caribbean drugs markets, which now made them international drug manufacturers.

The war on drugs also had adverse effects on the average Mexican citizen as well. As a means to take down drug cartels the government allocated the responsibility of the countries policing to the Mexican Military. With this new found authority, they were not only responsible for public security but also had the power to implement new laws. Throughout the duration of the altercation, there have been many occasions reported, on both the Mexican police and military, where they have been scrutinized for using illicit practice while carrying out job related duties. One instance of this was found when the United States Department of State declared that “the military in Mexico were accused of committing serious human rights violations as they carried out government efforts to combat drug cartels.” Some of these human rights violations included; illegal arrests, secret and prolonged detention, torture, rape, extrajudicial execution, and fabrication of evidence.

Since the origination of the Mexican Drug Market, drug traffickers have been known to pawn policemen and slaughter their rivals as a means to achieving organizational power. But more recently Mexico Cartels have been targeting politicians and local leaders in attempts to destabilize the country’s political structure. They aim to displace the national government so they can communize the state in their favor. This communization, would also evoke governmental corruption, legislative representation and access to the nation’s financial economy. Not to mention, the nation’s public security. Here it is clear that the existence of the Mexican Drug Market has been hazardous to the well-being of the Mexican society.

The United States Justice Department considers Mexico to be the greatest threat of organized crime toward that country. This statement is equally applicable to countries like Canada where the Mexican drug cartels attempts to maneuver cocaine inside the nation, which briefly prompted an upsurge in gang violence in Vancouver. This is heavily due to the fact that cocaine prices have increased in recent years as a result of a prolonged shortages. The Mexican Drug Market is also making its presence felt in Europe where it is known to be the biggest importer of cocaine to Europe, through Atlantic Ocean and up through Southern Europe.

On March 25, 2009, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton stated that “America’s insatiable demand for illegal drugs fuels the Mexican drug trade” and that, “the United States bears shared responsibility for the drug-fueled violence sweeping Mexico.” In seeking partnership from the United States, Mexican officials point out that the illicit drug trade is a shared problem in need of a shared solution. They also state that most of the financing for Mexican drug operations come from American drug consumers. As a result, the U.S. Congress passed legislation to provide Mexico and Central American countries with $1.6 billion USD for the Mérida Initiative, a three-year international assistance plan. The Mérida Initiative provides Mexico and Central American countries with law enforcement training, equipment, as well as structural advice to strengthen the national justice systems. It can also be highlighted that the Mérida Initiative does not include cash nor weapons. This instance illustrates a scene where the global community recognizes the detriment that arises from the Mexican Drug Market and makes an adamant attempt to prevent it.

Despite the hardships that arise from the Mexican Drug War, the efforts of government forces have not gone in vein. Most recently, the Mexican Operatives have captured drug lord Servando “La Tuta” Gomez, leader of the Templar Knights crime family of Western Mexico. Following his time being a school teacher, Mr. Gomez and his comrades were allegedly responsible for the abduction and apparent murder of 43 public servants, an act that was carried out by police accused of being corrupt and connected with the criminal gang. Amongst many on other treacherous and peril transgressions. Mr. Gomez and the Knights Templar also monopolized a very lucrative part of the methamphetamine trade that transpired in western Mexico, specifically, the Michoacán region. Although the detainee was known for his violent wrath and drug trafficking, he was also known for indulging in the business and political realm of the region and at one point took effective control over the state’s international port, Lazaro Cardenas, making millions from illegal mining of iron ore trading.

In the year of 2013 the Mexican government decided to close in on the leads that they had on Mr. Gomez. They successfully arrested Servando Gomez and forcefully regained control over the Michoacán region. During this time the state saw close to 40,000 murders within a two year span. It was within this time that the Mexican Government, led by Mr. Pena Nieto, President of Mexico, were able to mobilize the state and capture Servando Gomez. Following the feat, the President was quoted saying “With this arrest, the rule of law is strengthened in the country and [we] continue moving towards Mexico in Peace.” If the President of Mexico maintains on the course that he is on now, he may achieve just that. By continuing to capture cartel elites and regaining control of former gang territory the state of Mexico looks suited to become a nation emancipated from the Drug War.