Fuel Safety Prioritized Over Food Security In Bangladesh


Bangladesh will begin using grain to create ethanol, according to Reuters. Energy Ministry officials reported that they will be using a variety of grain, including broken rice grain, maize and molasses, in order to create ethanol to mix with fuel. However, the use of grains as ethanol has received a backlash by environmental experts who state it will put food safety at risk, especially for those who are impoverished and business owners.

Moshuir Rahman, who rallies the Bangladesh Poultry Industries Coordination Committee, stated that using grains for ethanol would be considered “suicidal”, according to Reuters. Bangladesh uses most of its maize to feed animals, but it does not grow enough grain, which they then import from other countries. Rahman stated, “Maize prices will go up if it is used for ethanol production. The price of eggs and chicken will go beyond the reach of common people”. Nasrul Hamid, the junior Energy Minister told Reuters that Bangladesh must become more ecologically friendly. Hamid stated, “You can’t remain out from the global trend of energy use… Yes, we are going to give our permission for bio-fuel soon. Let’s see what happens first”.

The bottom line is food security is vital. According to the World Food Programme, in 2015, 1/4 of the population of Bangladesh was food insecure. Using grain would indeed cause food prices to rise, leaving those who are impoverished to be even more food insecure than before, while the prices drag down part of the population who was on the verge of being food insecure to being food insecure as well. According to the Dhaka Tribute, a newspaper in Bangladesh, 53,000 individuals die from malnutrition annually. While it is important to ensure climate security, it is even more important to make sure all individuals have access to food within the nation. The nation must ensure to ensure that both food and climate security are taken care of, without infringing upon one another. In order to do so, different steps to ensure that Bangladesh is reducing their carbon monoxide emissions, including alternatives to driving and even making sure the factories working for these multinational corporations are releasing clean emissions as well. The government can also to reduce these emissions by investing into clean and renewable energy sources.

Bangladesh is one of the countries in the world that has fallen under the negative connotations of globalization. It is seen as a hub for cheap labour and manufacturing, resulting in a lot of foreign intervention by multinational corporations. There has always been the idea of having the “North within the South” concept, which means to have locals from a “South” country who help propagate what the “North” is doing within, for example, governments. Letting foreign countries intervene and using a very peculiar route to get clean emissions is putting a burden on the common people. In order for this to stop, the government must support the Bangladeshi people and allow themselves to impose climate security rules upon these factories, and finding ulterior routes for climate change. Routes that will not take the food out of the countryman’s mouth.

Sehar Malik

Sehar Malik has graduated with her BA from York University in Political Science. She is currently in a graduate certificate program for Government Relations. She specializes in security news in South Asia.

About Sehar Malik

Sehar Malik has graduated with her BA from York University in Political Science. She is currently in a graduate certificate program for Government Relations. She specializes in security news in South Asia.